WALK AWAY FOUL CALLS

The number one way to make your foul call more believable to coaches, players and fans is to slow down at the spot of the foul call and do the paperwork. The paperwork is who fouled, and how play is to be resumed. There are only two ways to resume play, either by free throws or by throw-ins. Stay put for a couple of seconds at the spot of the foul, slow down, make sure everything is ok with the player who was fouled and the player who fouled, make eye contact with the partner that is coming to replace you and who will administer the resumption of play and verbalize the pertinent information they need as to who is shooting or who makes the throw in. Then go to the table, and go with a purpose.

The number one way to make your foul call less believable to coaches, players and fans is to walk away from the spot of the call immediately upon filling the whistle with air. Then as you walk toward the table, look back over your shoulder to try and find the number of the player who fouled or to tell your partners where to resume play or if shots are going to be awarded.

Walk away foul calls or “hit and run” foul calls as they are sometimes called are bad enough when they are executed by the trail or center, but they are especially bad looking when they are done by the lead.
During the course of the game, coaches, players, and fans build confidence in your abilities by their perception as to whether you know what you are doing or not. Slow down and look like you know what you are doing. It is such an easy and effective way to increase your believability.

In the video clip below, the lead official gets the call right but immediately takes off for the table and never really gives a foul signal, never really gives a block signal and looks back over his shoulder the entire time trying to find the number of the player who fouled. This is an example of what Dave Hall calls taking an 8 foul call and turning it into a 2 by the time the reporting is done.

Ray lutz

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